How to Reduce Your Recovery Time After a Tough Workout

(StatePoint) More Americans are investing their time and energy in the pursuit of fitness these days, with the percentage of people belonging to gyms and health clubs nearly doubling from 2000-2017, according to Statista. Beyond casual workouts, participation in extreme sports and endurance events has grown exponentially in the past 25 years. Whether you’ve recently started exercising, are ramping up your efforts or have always been an avid sports enthusiast, you’ve probably dealt with soreness and fatigue after a tough workout.

While rest days are critical for athletes and exercisers of all levels, no one wants to be sidelined for too long and lose their momentum. To turbocharge your recovery process and get back into the game faster, consider these techniques:

• Complete a dynamic warm-up: Before physical activity, perform a dynamic warm-up to wake up muscles and get oxygen and blood flowing. Take your body through its full range of motion with effective moves, including high knees, butt kicks, forward and sideways leg swings and shoulder rolls.

• Consider CBD: With a similar molecular structure to the naturally occurring endocannabinoids produced by the human body, cannabidiol (CBD) sports supplements can assist with your preparation, performance and recovery, according to research.

Check out the hemp-derived, custom-formulated supplements from Champions + Legends, which offers a portfolio of products used by some of the world’s most elite athletes to help keep them training, performing and recovering at a high level, including James Harrison, a two-time Super Bowl champion, Hafþór “Thor” Júlíus Björnsson Gregor, an Icelandic strongman, deadlift world record holder, and “Game of Thrones” actor, rock climbers, Adam Ondra and Tommy Caldwell, CrossFit athletes, Sara Sigmundsdóttir and Pat Vellner, and Jay Glazer, football insider and MMA trainer.

“There is a big difference between just taking the day off and consciously recovering,” says Sonny Mottahed, founder and CEO of Champions + Legends. “Better recovery means you can train harder next time.”

To learn more, visit ChampionsandLegends.com.

• Know your limits: While strength and endurance gains can only happen if you push your limits, it’s important to remember that improving athletic performance is a gradual process. Be mindful of your current strength, endurance and flexibility and learn to distinguish between normal soreness and discomfort, and pain that could be a sign it’s time to slow down or take a break.

• Cross-train: The same type of exercise day in and day out can make you more susceptible to physical and mental burnout. Cross-training will not only give you an edge in your main sport, it can also help you recover faster.

• Foam roll: You don’t need a big budget or much time to receive the positive benefits of a deep tissue massage. Give yourself the spa treatment at home. Post workout, foam roll to reduce tension of large muscle groups and targeted areas. The harder the foam roller’s density, the deeper into muscle tissue you can go. You may find it helpful to have multiple rollers to choose from, depending on the muscle area and your level of soreness that day.

• Refuel rapidly: Good nutrition is essential for swift recovery. Be sure to refuel quickly after tough workouts to aid muscle repair.

You only have one body, so treat it well. Seek out the tools and knowledge you need to fully recover, faster.

Photo Credit: (c) Ridofranz / iStock via Getty Images Plus

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