struck

Corporal Henry Harrison Struck holding a flag during his time serving in the U.S. Army.

 

Corporal Henry Harrison Struck, a late resident of Kaufman County, served in Germany during World War I.

Struck was born Dec. 30, 1888 in Lyons, Texas. After his childhood, he went to work for the railroad before he enlisted into the United States Army.

From working for the railroad and hanging around the Railroad Depot, he learned how to use Morse Code and took his skills with him into the Army.

Struck’s job was to send reports from the tenches to headquarters of Gen. John J. Pershing. He pulled telegraph cables between the trenches so they could communicate with one another; they also had wireless sets at the time. 

During one of the wars, Germans deployed bomb-like fireworks that sent out smoldering pieces of metal flying. Struck was hit with one of the pieces of smoldering metal in the collarbone. Despite being hit, he continued to serve his duties because it was his job. Struck served in four battles during World War I.

Corporal Struck returned back from Germany, landing in New York City; Struck along with thousands of other soldiers were treated to hotel rooms as well as fine dining.

Struck went to work for the depot agent in Rosser, Texas for the Texas Midland Railroad after his service for the U.S. Army. In the early 1940s, he moved to Van Alstyne location for the Texas Midland’s Depot. Her retired later in the early 1950s and lived the rest of his life living on Madison Street in Kaufman. Struck passed away on Dec. 15, 1978 in Dallas at age 89.

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